we know this place

artist : nadijah robinson

BLACK INFINITY

 

BLACK INFINITY

An on-going series by Nadijah Robinson

 Just at a time when a post-racial era is supposed to unearth peace and love among races, we see a vicious racism bursting forth into that undeniably visible space of our collective unconscious – the media. It seems as if it is open season on Black people. We continue to see an intensification of violence against Black people perpetrated by law-enforcement, the injustice and ignorance of the legal system, the education system, and every facet of the state and private sectors. The war on Black has never really ended. There is no corner of the world untainted by the vileness of anti-Black racism, and this is a fact that has hardened the hearts and perfected the resilience-response of Black people. Black people have inherited a struggle against our own misuse, abuse and annihilation. We have inherited a magical strength, vulnerability and limitless cultural colour so that we continue to produce and define ‘cool’, art, worth and ourselves. We are beautiful beyond measure, and hunted for it.

BLACK INFINITY illuminates the hidden details of our existence. How do we deal with, understand and assimilate the pain, the grief, the anger, the pride, the joyous loud-belly laughter of our inheritance? How do we visualize ourselves into the future? How do we honour, place, and praise those who have gone before, those who are stolen from us as we were once stolen? The on-going series begins to tell a different kind of story about Black people, one in which we survive into forever.

BLACK INFINITY = a bit of black swagger + magical realism + broken hearts + ancestor worship + afrofuturism

Reckoning (Black Infinity), 2012

Nadijah Robinson

Mixed media on wood panel

12 x 24.5 inches

$500

Live with the ominous memory of ancestors, generations, grandparents, and great- grandparents surviving, resisting, being killed and choosing homegoing instead of the indignity and putrid reality of centuries of slavery. Then imagine they returned, for a reckoning.

A Double-Edged Sword 

(Black Infinity), 2012

Nadijah Robinson

Mixed media on wood panel

12 x 24 inches

$385

Who may justifiably bear arms and use them against another human being? When Black people bear arms, they are made more powerful and more vulnerable. The bullets are cycled, returned, turned against others, and ourselves.

Not Your Victim, for TWOC 

(Black Infinity), 2012

Nadijah Robinson

Mixed media on wood panel

12 x 24 inches

$385

Trans* women of colour are being hunted in Chicago and elsewhere. Their self-defense is criminalized as in the case of Cece McDonald. Their right to live and survive is being defiled. Brightest lights are snuffed out in silence, and we can hear their voices whistling out in the turn of a stomach harboring anger, in the rising temperature of a squeezed fist, of palms pressed together in fear. Self defense means fighting back.

Seven H(a)unted Acquitted Police, for Junior Manon 

(Black Infinity), 2012

Nadijah Robinson

Mixed media on wood panel

12 x 36 inches

$600

Police violence occurs without consequence, and beyond the grief of our loss of loved ones, the lack of justice attempts to erase our existence. 18 year old healthy boys do not die suddenly of heart attacks in a run-in with seven police officers. Police officers, trespassers, carry and smuggle our young and old into their next lives. The officers’ lives are cursed. They will live with the weight of the responsibility of murder on their chests until it colours the lives of their generations to come.

BLCK INFINITY SHOW @ ACCENTS (older works)

My Mother’s Body / After She Closed Up Where I Came From, 2010

Nadijah Robinson

Cotton eyelet fabric, bleach, fabric dye, embroidery thread, wood dowel, wire

49 x 52 inches

$1,500

A significant moment in the history of my relationship with my mother happened when I was five years old. I realized a painful truth: that my mother’s body and my own are separate, as are our lives. She explained to me that she had had her tubes tied, and what that meant, and I realized that we each make decisions about our own bodies. This piece is a visual memory of this moment made physical.

 

“When I die, others will come. I am sure of that.” – Malalai Joya / Limbs Piece, 2010

Nadijah Robinson

Fabric, dye, wood, thread

48 x 46 inches

$850

Often those involved in social justice struggles experience a kind of nihilism and hopelessness at the seeming inefficacy of their actions. The quote by Malalai Joya, a former Afghani politician and activist, made clear that movements are not completed by individuals, nor do they fit neatly into a series of actions or the lifetime of an activist. Movements span lifetimes, are inherited and taken up by succeeding generations, they involve many. The sureness and the humility of her statement reminds us that change often happens slowly but surely.

 

Exodus, 2010

Nadijah Robinson

Fabric, screen ink, dye, bleach

42 x 60 inches

$845

The feeling of being unwelcome, unwanted, ignored, and feared in public spaces is a visceral feeling of erasure. The indignity and rage at this experience, which many marginalized people share, is what inspired Exodus.

 

Ancestors, 2010

Nadijah Robinson

Fabric, dye, tempera, thread

36 x 24 inches

$425

This fabric piece is homage and an acknowledgement to the gifts that are inherited from ancestors. Knowing where you come from is a gift that not all of us get. Histories of colonized peoples are erased, but if we are lucky, oral histories remain.

 

Boom Bip/B-Boy InStance, 2009

Nadijah Robinson

Fabric, screen ink, wooden stick, braided thread

14 x 78 inches

$150 Individual per panel

$750 Series

Aesthetic and style invented within the Black diasporic communities have roots that can be traced to African styles, traditions, and art forms. This piece freezes break-dancers and dancehall queens in time, against a background of faux-African print that vibrates with sound and energy.

BLACK INFINITY opening reception

Image

 

new artwork by Nadijah Robinson.

————– BLACK –INFINITY—————–

just at a time when a post-racial era is supposed to unearth peace and love among races (right), we see a vicious racism bursting forth into that undeniably visible space of our collective unconscious – the media.

it seems as if its open season, again. forever.

what happens to all of the black beings that are killed, or disappeared? i imagine they all attend an increasingly ill house party in some realm of ancestors, so that i may go on surviving.

a bit of black swagger + magical realism + broken hearts + ancestor worship + afrofuturism = BLACK INFINITY

BLACK INFINITY is a new series by Nadijah Robinson.

————– BLACK –INFINITY—————–

opening reception: Sept 30, 6:30pm at Accents Bookstore (1790 Eglinton Ave. W, Toronto ) $5
performances + poetry + artist talk + love

closing reception: Oct 21, 6:30pm at Accents Bookstore

this art exhibition runs from Sept 26 – Oct 26.

programflyerfront2web copy

LL Programs Flyer

Lost Lyrics Promo Flyer 2012

programflyerback2web copy

LL Programs Flyer (back)

Lost Lyrics Promo Flyer 2012

bb back A web copyblog

LL business card B (back)

bookmark-size business card for Lost Lyrics (back) 2011

bb front A web copy

LL business card B

bookmark-size business card for Lost Lyrics (front) 2011

bb back B web copyblog

LL business card A (back)

bookmark-size business card for Lost Lyrics (back) 2011

bb front B web copy

LL business card A

bookmark-size business card for Lost Lyrics (front) 2011

ADflyerfront web copy

LL ArtisticDevelopment

graphic design. 2011

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